black-ography

Biographical posts in 40 words or less.
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pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 26, 1948: President Harry Truman Signs Executive Order 9981

On this day in 1948, President Truman issued an executive order abolishing racial segregation in all branches of the armed forces and establishing the President’s Committee on Equality of Treatment and Opportunity in the Armed Services. This major piece of legislation was a welcome victory for the African American soldiers’ “Double V” campaign, in which they fought both WWII abroad and racism at home.

Learn more about the importance of Truman’s order with a featured video from Tavis Smiley.

Photo: The Chicago Defender announces Executive Order 9981. Library of Congress Exhibition

leeswank:

kenyabenyagurl:

archdrude:

The Amazing Connections Between the Inca and Egyptian Cultures 

"The ancient Egyptians (in Africa) and the ancient pre-Incas/Incas (in South America) evolved on opposite sides of the globe and were never in contact.

Yet, both cultures mysteriously possessed the same strikingly identical body of ancient art, architecture, symbolism, mythology and religion.

The Victorian era scholars, faced with this enigma, concluded that both cultures must have been children of the same Golden Age parent civilization, “Atlantis.”

Today, Egyptian/Inca parallels are not only being ignored by American and Western scholars, they’re being suppressed.

Many baffling and unsolved similarities link the ancient Egyptians and the ancient pre-Incas/Incas ― even though both cultures evolved on opposite sides of the planet, separated by oceans” Read More

Ancient History is always important.

(via bktoatl)

cartermagazine:

Today In History
‘Gwendolyn Brooks became the first Black person to win a “Pulitzer Prize.” Brooks won the award for her book, Annie Allen, on this date May 1, 1950.’
(photo: Gwendolyn Brooks)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History

‘Gwendolyn Brooks became the first Black person to win a “Pulitzer Prize.” Brooks won the award for her book, Annie Allen, on this date May 1, 1950.’

(photo: Gwendolyn Brooks)

- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History
‘Septima Poinsette Clark, educator, civil rights activist, was born on this date May 3, 1898. Clark received the “Living Legacy Award” from President Jimmy Carter.’
(photo: Septima Poinsette Clark)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History

‘Septima Poinsette Clark, educator, civil rights activist, was born on this date May 3, 1898. Clark received the “Living Legacy Award” from President Jimmy Carter.’

(photo: Septima Poinsette Clark)

- CARTER Magazine

239 plays
Ray Charles,
Pure Genius: The Complete Atlantic Recordings (1952-1959) Disc 5

diggys-daily:

SONG OF THE DAY:

RAY CHARLES- (NIGHT TIME IS) THE RIGHT TIME

(via lovelylisa22)

specialnights:

Floetry ft. Common - SupaStar

Nice!!!

(via sheilastansbury)

Feel like a little Jacksons, not to be confused with the Jackson 5 or solo Michael.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

January 31, 1919: Jackie Robinson Is Born

On this day in 1919, baseball great and civil rights icon Jackie Robinson was born in Cairo, Georgia. Robinson smashed records and knocked down major social barriers on his way to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962.  



Test your knowledge of Jackie Robinson and his contributions off the field with PBS Black Culture Connection’s Jackie Robinson quiz.

Photo Credit: National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, Cooperstown, NY.

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott exchanged vows on June 18, 1953. The ceremony was performed by Reverend Martin Luther King Sr on the lawn of Coretta’s parents home in Marion, Alabama. MLK and Coretta became parents to four children: Yolanda Denise, Martin Luther III, Dexter Scott, and Bernice Albertine.

Yolanda Denise, born on November 17, 1955, was the first-born child of Martin Luther King and Coretta Scott King. She was a human rights activist and an actress. Yolanda was active in many projects that honored her late father. In 1978 she played the role of Rosa Parks in a TV miniseries, King, that was based on the life of her father. She was a spokesperson for the National Stroke Awareness Association and active gay rights advocate. Yolanda die suddenly of an assumed heart attack on May 15, 2007 at the age of 51.

The first son born into the King family was Martin Luther King III. Concerned about burdening the child with having to live up to the legacy of MLK Jr. He was only 10 years old when his famous father was assassinated. He headed the Southern Christian Leadership Conference that was founded by his father and most recently served as director and co-owner of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change with his brother, Dexter Scott King. He spoke at the Democratic National Convention in August of 2008 and it marked two major occasions of note: the first black nomination for president, Barack Obama, and the 45th anniversary of the “I Have a Dream” speech.

Dexter Scott King was born on January 30, 1961. Dexter started out in the same direction as MLK Jr. when he attended Morehouse College. But the younger King left school to become an actor and documentary maker. For a brief time he took the reigns as president of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change but left after a dispute with his mother. Dexter’s life was filled with legal problems that have pursued him to this day. He and his siblings have been in and out of court with accusations of mismanagement and misuse of assets.

And the youngest of the family, Bernice Albertine King, was only five years old when her grieving image was captured as she stood at her mother’s side at Martin Luther King’s funeral. The photograph was taken by Moneta Sleet and was the recipient of a Pulitzer Prize. Even though Bernice was too young to have experienced the crusade that her famous father devoted himself to, she has been a tireless advocate of his legacy.

As for Dr. King’s widow, Coretta Scott King went forward and kept her late husband’s message alive through her social rights activism that continued throughout her life. She embraced many controversial issues including her support of gay marriages and her belief that her husband’s killer, James Earl Ray, was not the real killer of her husband. Coretta passed away in her sleep on January 30, 2006 at the age of 78.

http://www.drmartinlutherking.net/martin-luther-king-family.php